The McCullagh Group Members

The McCullagh Group

Currently we consist of one PI, one postdoc, and six graduate students. (Kelly Du Pont is missing from this photo)

Martin McCullagh

PI

My research interests lie in using computer simulation to understand how biology uses physical chemistry to achieve function. This interest started during my Ph. D at Northwestern where I studied how light interacts with small DNA fragments. I went on to do a postdoc at the University of Chicago where I studied energy transfer processes in large proteins. I am currently interested in how biology achieves self-assembly and energy transduction. Understanding these phenomena will allow us to harness that ability to design novel materials and nanotechnology.

CV: CV

E: martin.mccullagh@colostate.edu


Peter (Rex) Lake

Postdoc

My research interests are to understand how the complexity of large systems can be modeled with relatively few physically relevant parameters. I received my PhD at University of California, Berkeley where I studied cluster theories of gases to understand the liquid-vapor phase transition of atomic nuclei. Currently, I am researching the coarse-grained potentials used to model macromolecules in solution and how they can be parameterized from their physical properties. Improving these potentials will lead to more reliable models of macromolecule aggregation.

E: peter.lake@colostate.edu


Russell Davidson

Graduate Student

I received my bachelor's degree in chemistry from Elon University. Now at CSU, I am a fifth year graduate student where I am modeling the energy transfer mechanisms utilized by motor proteins such as helicases. If I'm not at my computer, I am likely outside (mountain biking, skiing, or enjoying a beer from one of the local breweries).

E: russell.davidson@colostate.edu


Mortaza Derakshani

Graduate Student

I received my Bachelor's degree from University of Tabriz. I am interested in studying structure and function of biological systems by theoretical and computational means. In particular my research is related to asphaltene self-assembly process which plays a key role in crude oil pipeline clogs. We employ the knowledge of statistical mechanics and method of molecular dynamics to gain better understanding of this process.

E: mortaza.derakshanimolayousefi@colostate.edu


Kevin Votaw

Graduate Student

I received my bachelor's degree from the University of Central Missouri. Now as a graduate student I am seeking to scrutinize biological processes using computational methods, with particular interest in quantum relationships.

E: kevin.votaw@colostate.edu


Jake Anderson

Graduate Student

I received my Bachelor's degree from Belhaven University. I am currently in my third year of graduate school at Colorado State University. My research interests include modeling charged metals found in proteins to be used in molecular dynamic simulations to be applied in Alzheimers research.

E: jakob.anderson@colostate.edu


Kelly Du Pont

Graduate Student

I received my bachelor's degree from James Madison University. I am currently joint with Dr. Brian Geiss in Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology. My research interests are focused on studying the mechanism of drug binding in biological systems with the use of computational and experimental methods.

E: kelly.dupont@colostate.edu


Ryan Weber

Graduate Student

I received my bachelor’s degree from Truman State University in both Chemistry and Physics. I am currently a third year graduate student at Colorado State University. My research interests are in computational studies of PDI-peptide self-assembly and their potential applications as switchable self-assembling electronic biomaterials.

E: ryan.weber@colostate.edu


Heidi Klem (left)

Graduate Student

I received my bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from Creighton University. I am currently joint with Dr. Rob Paton. My primary interest is the application of machine learning approaches to analyze allosteric inhibition, and predict bond dissociation enthalpies with a particular focus on drug molecules.

E: heidi.klem@colostate.edu


Emily Landgreen

Undergraduate Student

I am working as a REU student this summer (2018) at Colorado State University. My research involves using molecular dynamic simulations to model dipeptide systems to determine the process of self-assembly of aggregates.

E: elandgreen14@winona.edu


Rachel Ware

Undergraduate Student

E: riware13@vt.edu


Bradley Soares

Undergraduate Student

I participated in the 2017 Chemistry REU program in the McCullagh Lab. I conducted computational research on the structure of an innate immune response receptor, called RIG-I, found in humans that detects arboviruses.

E: bradleysoares3@outlook.com


Josie Hendrix

Undergraduate Student

As an undergraduate student my research focuses on studying viral helicase proteins using molecular dynamics simulations. This research utilizes simulation programs such as VMD, Amber MD, and MD Analysis to model energy transduction pathways in a viral protein.

E: josie_hendrix@berkeley.edu


Troy Brier

Undergraduate Student

I am working in the Mccullagh lab this summer (2016) as part of the CSU REU program as an undergraduate student. My research focused on performing MD simulations of dengue NS3 solvated in small ligands to identify regions susceptible to drug binding.

E: troyb2@illinois.edu


Gregory Poisson

Undergraduate Student

As an undergraduate Computer Science student, my interests lie largely in the field of processing large quantities of data in the pursuit of meaningful but unknown relationships between pieces of information. I experiment privately with small, homemade tests in artificial intelligence, and I focus on bringing fast, effective code to improve the quality of computational chemistry analyses. I worked as an Arabic translator and earned my Associates degree during my 5 years in the US Marines, and have made a home in Fort Collins while I work on completing my Bachelor's degree.

E: gregory.poisson@colostate.edu